Persistent Pain : Rohan Osteopathy Posts
• Our clinics are based in Benson at Ivy Cottage, Chapel Lane, Benson, Oxfordshire OX10 6LU (nr Wallingford) and in Abingdon (Locations Link). We are accepted by all major insurance companies. By checking company or family policies patients often find they are covered for a course of treatment.

• Osteopaths are trained to recognise and treat a number of causes of pain and dysfunction and all osteopaths are recognised under the auspices of the `Osteopaths Act` (1993). Further information relating to how osteopaths treat, the philosophy behind treatment and also what to expect when visiting an osteopath can be found in our FAQs section. More information is available at the osteopathic information pages or you can phone me to discuss any aspects of treatment on t: 01491-838866 

Rohan Iswariah D.O. is a fully trained osteopath, registered with the General Osteopathic Council since its inaugeration in May 2000. I gained my qualification from  The British School Of Osteopathy  in 1983 and have been in full time practice treating all age groups for a wide range of conditions ever since. All osteopaths are required to undertake regular development and training (CPD). Here is a list of courses and lectures that I have attended since 2004 as part of a continual learning and advancement process. 

Our clinics accept most major insurance companies. For further information regarding claim protocols please e-mail.  rohaniswariah@hotmail.com


     Osteopathy in Oxfordshire & Berkshire
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Osteopathy in Oxfordshire
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Persistent Pain

by rohan iswariah on 10/30/19

Persistent Pain

We all feel pain from time to time. When someone injures themselves, specific nerves recognise this as pain, which in turn triggers the body’s repair mechanism. As the problem resolves, the pain tends to improve and usually disappears within 3-6 months. This type of pain could be argued to be beneficial: if it hurts, you are likely to try and avoid doing whatever it is that has caused the pain in the future, so you are less likely to injure yourself in that way again.

Occasionally the pain continues even after tissue healing has finished. When pain continues after this point, it becomes known as persistent (or is sometimes referred to as chronic) pain. This type of pain is not beneficial and is a result of the nerves becoming over-sensitised, which means that a painful response will be triggered much more easily than normal. This can be unpleasant, but doesn’t necessarily mean that you are doing yourself any harm simply by moving. You could think of this as a sensitive car alarm that goes off in error when someone walks past.

Persistent pain is very common and effects over 14 million people in the UK alone. It often does not respond to conventional medical interventions and needs a different kind of approach, but there are many things that you can do to manage your pain yourself with the support of your osteopath, your family and loved-ones. Keeping active, performing exercises and stretches can help, learning to pace your activities so that you don’t trigger a flare-up of your pain as well as setting goals and priorities are all very important and can help you to maintain a fulfilling lifestyle.

For more information on how to manage your persistent pain, speak to your osteopath or visit http://www.paintoolkit.org/



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